New Vice Chancellor of Health Chosen

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UC Irvine welcomes David Bailey, vice chancellor for health sciences and interim dean of the UC San Diego School of Medicine, as the new vice chancellor for health affairs at UCI, starting April 1.
As vice chancellor, Bailey will oversee the UCI Medical Center, the UCI faculty physician practice and the UCI College of Health Sciences. In addition to serving as vice chancellor, Bailey will also be the dean of the UCI School of Medicine.
According to the Orange County Register, Bailey’s position was created after the chief executive of UCI Medical Center, Ralph Cygan, resigned due to a crisis caused by misrepresentations to transplant patients and regulators in UCI’s liver transplant program in early 2006. Chancellor Michael Drake hopes that Bailey’s new dual position of overseeing the medical school and the hospital will provide a new level of accountability to patients and the public.
Bailey received his bachelor in science degree in chemistry with high distinction from Indiana University in 1967 and earned his medical degree from Yale University in 1973. By 1977, he had completed his postgraduate training from Yale and moved to UCSD, where he has been for 14 years.
During his time at UCSD, Bailey has served as professor of pathology, director of clinical laboratories, division head, vice chairman of the Department of Pathology, deputy vice chancellor for health sciences and both interim vice chancellor and dean for the School of Medicine.
Along with the various positions he has held, Bailey conducts research at UCSD in clinical toxicology and the pharmacology of psychoactive drugs. In some of his work Bailey has investigated the binding of cocaine and its analogs to human tissues as well as studying the epidemiology of overdose and abuse of numerous drugs. He has published many papers regarding these studies and has been distinguished by the Institute for Scientific Information as one of the world’s 10 most cited authors in forensic science. Not only has he been featured on various ‘Who’s Who’ lists, but he has also been president of the California Association of Toxicologists and president of the Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists, which honored him with the Gerald T. Evans award.
‘My 14 years as department chairman have helped me appreciate the importance of departmental governance, and my years as professor have enabled me to value the importance of faculty ‘shared governance’ inherent in the UC system,’ Bailey said.
UCI’s School of Medicine is among the top 50 in the nation for research funding and includes one Nobel Prize winner, four members of the Institute of Medicine and five National Academy of Science Members. With such a background, Bailey is eager to work with the medical school’s faculty, staff and students.
‘This position will provide me the opportunity to work with the faculty and leadership to create a synergy among these components so that the sum of the parts is greater than the whole. Together, I hope that we will take UCI health sciences to its next level of greatness.’

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