EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Zachary Avallone is a second-year international studies major.
How would you foster student activism?
There are numerous avenues that students already have to become activist students. I believe that in order for ASUCI to effectively change this campus, there needs to be more direct ‘outside’ student input. I want to work with club leaders through the Anterateer Leadership Forum and with direct club visits to get a better understanding of what issues students are passionate about. I believe that these political clubs need more exposure to the student body and we need to find ways to pool the resources of ASUCI and these clubs together in order to cooperate and truly make an effective change.
Since one of the main duties of the executive vice president is to oversee ASUCI elections, what will you do to ensure as many students as possible will participate in the elections?
I will utilize all available modes of communication. I will send out campuswide e-mails to encourage candidates and to send out reminders to vote. I will visit clubs to tell them firsthand what positions are available. Also, I will make full use of fliers, picket signs and posters so everyone will know when it is time to cast their ballots.

Tye Nguyen Mai is a fifth-year philosophy and art history major.
How would you foster student activism?
Since one of the main duties of the executive vice president is to oversee ASUCI elections, what will you do to ensure as many students as possible will participate in the elections?
The last two questions are related; the answer to both of them is trust. I hear about professors abandoning their classes to go do research and departments being cut in the middle of the quarter because of budget issues. I understand that this is a research university, but the creation of knowledge should not come at the price of screwing us over. Students can’t do anything about the problems with the university if we don’t work together. We can’t work together if we don’t trust each other. If we don’t work together to effect change then students feel powerless. But how does ASUCI earn the trust of the students? I believe that what goes on in ASUCI should be as transparent as possible. ASUCI’s Web site could be used for this purpose. Every executive and legislator should have their own personal Web page and use it well. Let everyone know what projects and bills you are working on in detail, and why you feel that project or bill is beneficial to students. If shady things are going on, shining light on how ASUCI works will make shady things more difficult. Once ASUCI establishes trust with students it will be easier to work for change, if students see that change is possible they will make their voices heard by voting.

Lisha Kathleen Maddox is a third-year English and sociology major.
How would you foster student activism?
I would get students involved in UCSA in order to foster student activism on a statewide level. I would expand Lobby Core, a program that teaches student show to lobby and takes them up north to lobby at the capital, and expand in-district lobbying.
Since one of the main duties of the executive vice president is to oversee ASUCI elections, what will you do to ensure as many students as possible will participate in the elections?
Past ASUCI elections have not been properly advertised nor have they been fair. Too many of our students have no idea when the elections are, where they vote or who they are even voting for. As I stressed before, communication and publicity are key.
All elections and the spaces on the Elections Commission will be publicized weeks in advance to ensure the maximum amount of participation and fairness when the election actually takes place. Getting a diverse number of people from across the campus community in the elections and on the Elections Commission will bring UC Irvine’s student government to the students, and empower them to make necessary changes on our campus.