Why do We Give Up and Lose Interest in Sports We Play so Easily?

Let me get a show of hands from those of you who at some point in your life, prior to coming to UCI, actively played or participated in some type of sport.
Realizing now that I can’t actually count the amount of hands that are raised, I’ll just go on and assume that a good chunk of UCI students, myself included, fall into that category.
Now, those of you in this category who are still out there fighting the good fight, throwing the good pitch have nothing to fear from this column because I applaud you on your continued dedication.
However, those of you who are like me and have given up on pretty much everything you did back in the glory days better have a good answer to this next question: Why have you given up?
For me, it was a combination of bodily pain and laziness that pushed me away from my sports path. Some of my friends share this predicament and have abandoned their recreational worship over time.
Others have been forced out of what they do for matters that were out of their control, such as not having enough time to be dedicated anymore.
What is it that those who have given up do now?
Well, I can’t speak for everyone, but my friends and I, who have either given up or been pushed away from sports, have traded in the hours of practices for a two-hour game of soccer on Friday afternoons where there are more injuries than actual playing.
It’s not a bad thing, in the long run.
As you get older it’s expected that you dedicate more of your time to matters that are going to have a greater effect on your life.
But it’s just sad for those people who have devoted a good portion of their youth to training and practices and now realize that it was all for nothing.
Take me, for example. I’ve been playing sports since elementary school.
I remember getting up at a nice and late 7:30 a.m., heading off to school, then making my way to practice until nightfall.
Why did I keep doing this every day for about three years?
Well, I wanted to be the best so I kept pushing myself.
Sadly, after three years of hard work, I lost interest and decided to hang up my glove and ball cap.
I figured maybe baseball isn’t exactly my cup of tea, which meant I had to find out what was.
So I turned to soccer which actually also pleased my parents.
For some reason, I didn’t catch on to the fact that baseball was too dull for them to watch, but with soccer there was constant action on the field so they were entertained.
Oh, and who can forget the fact that they had the occasional chance to see me get beamed in the face by my own teammate.
But getting up at 6 a.m. for junior high, going to soccer practice and then coming home to do my homework still wasn’t enough for me.
I decided to add a karate class to my schedule.
Now that I look back at it, I think this terrible schedule was just a subconscious way for me to get back at my parents for laughing at me every time I was beamed in the head.
After all, they were the ones who had to drive me from one place to the next.
So after two years of running back and forth, I decided to hang up my cleats.
They looked nice next to my spiderweb-covered baseball glove.
I once again found myself letting go of a sport not because I was bad at it, but because it really didn’t inspire me as something to pursue anymore.
The question in my mind at that point: Where do I go from here?
I remember realizing that I needed to turn to the keeper of all knowledge, something that many people even here at UCI have trned to