The Screenwriter Is God Here

Enter the doors of Humanities Hall 178 on June 1 through June 3 between 7 PM and 10 PM and you’ll enter a realm where ‘the screenwriter is God,’ as UC Irvine guest lecturer Marie Cartier said.
Cartier is the founder of UC Irvine’s Screenwriting Festival, which in its 14th year brought six scripts to life with casts of up to 11 actors. Students taking the Film and Media Studies 117 Scriptwriting series wrote the scripts over the last three quarters. Each night of the festival consisted of an opening script, which was not completed by the time of the festival, followed by a completed 100-plus-page feature-length screenplay.
Script genres included comedy, drama, thriller and romance. At the end of each night, the audience rated the scripts, and at the end of the three-day festival, awards were given for the best opening and the best feature-length script.
For the opening script, writers Billy McLellan and Jenny Lewis won with ‘Love Line,’ a romantic comedy that starts when a dog trainer rear-ends a beautiful woman in a car accident. The two exchange business cards, but the dog trainer finds that the woman gave him the card of a palmist. He visits the palmist in search of the woman he rear-ended but ends up finding the love of his life instead.
The audience award for the best feature-length script went to ‘Silent Witness,’ a 100-page thriller written by Adam Angeles, David Doeum and Nelson Xysavanh.
‘It’s about Eddie Weiling’s suicide,’ Angeles said, ‘Where his close friend Ryan Wesley, a well-known detective from Kentucky, comes to the funeral, where Eddie’s wife asks [him] to investigate the apparent suicide. Wesley begins to investigate whether it was a suicide or murder and uncovers a web of scandals,’ ‘Silent Witness’ took a full three quarters to write, with the three writers meeting a minimum of three hours a week.
Another full-length feature script was ‘Javier: Portait of a Deadbeat Slacker,’ written by a large group consisting of Alejandra Cisneros, Mel A. Laos, Natasha Minasian, Tuong Tran and Jose Troconis. Lovingly called ‘Javier’ by the writers, who plan to revise it because ‘[we] really love it and want to find some way to sell it and put it out there.’
‘[‘Javier’ is] about a slacker