Review of New Clubs

UC Irvine’s campus
offers a myriad of college-enhancing opportunities, consisting in large part of
the 400 registered clubs and organizations. New organizations are established
yearly. Here are three that will launch this school year:

Onnuri English Ministry

Though Onnuri (which
means ‘all nation’ in Korean) is the largest church in Korea with over 40,000
members, the Onnuri English Ministry (OEM) strives to harbor a smaller and more
intimate group of brothers and sisters.

Edward Park, a third
year biological sciences major, decided to establish OEM at UCI with the intent
of offering a haven to people who may feel too far from their churches back
home.

OEM extends comforting
arms to newcomers who may be seeking religion in Irvine. During Welcome Week,
OEM hopes to recruit freshmen and transfer students.

Current UCI students
of all backgrounds are also welcome to join.

‘It is a church for
all nations,’ Park said.

Park hopes that OEM
will plan activities such as volunteering in soup kitchens and missions in
Mexico. This summer, about 20 members gathered for a mission to Peru.

‘Onnuri was founded 18
years ago with the vision of modeling itself after the early church in the book
of Acts, centered on anointed preaching, passionate worship and the globalization
of the Good News of Jesus,’ says the Onnuri English Ministry’s Web site.

OEM is affiliated with
the local Irvine Onnuri church, located on the corner of Jamboree and McGaw.

Please contact Edward
Park at edwardp@uci.edu or (714) 757-3765 for more information.

Student Society for Stem Cell
Research

The controversy over
stem cell research has amplified in recent years with advancing biological
technology. Because stem cell research uses human embryos, some critics view it
as a violation of the sanctity of human life.

Sharyn Rossi,
second-year graduate student in anatomy and neurobiology, and Monica
Sieganthaler, fourth-year graduate student in anatomy and neurobiology, have
worked together to start the UCI chapter of the national Student Society for Stem
Cell Research, a club intended to ‘educate the public about stem cell research
and eliminate any previous misconceptions about stem cell research,’ according
to Rossi.

The journal ‘Fertility
and Sterility’ said that there were at least 396,526 human embryos in storage
as of April 11, 2002. Though most of them will be used for attempts at
pregnancy, thousands of unclaimed embryos will be either destroyed or stored
indefinitely.

‘But these embryos
would be thrown away anyway, so if [critics] really valued life, why not use
them?’ Rossi said. ‘Stem cells are important biological tools. They have the
ability to become any cell in the body. … We would have a constant supply of
these cells if only our government would fund us.’

Because stem cell
research has become not only a scientific issue but an ethical, social and
political one as well, SSSCR welcomes members from all majors, ‘even if people
have no idea what stem cell research is.’

SSSCR is a national
organization, and UC Irvine will be its 15th chapter.

SSSCR will be
recruiting at their booth on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of Welcome Week.
Their first meeting will be a gathering at 4 p.m. on Thursday in the courtyard
between Hewitt Hall and Sprague Hall.

Please contact Sharyn
Rossi and Monica Sieganthaler at SSSCR.UCI@gmail.com or (949) 824-3265 for
more information.

The Photographers’ Society

The 1989 film ‘Dead
Poets Society’ stars Robin Williams as an English teacher who uses unique
techniques to inspire poetry students, who rekindle an old literary club called
the Dead Poets Society.

Inspired by the movie,
Richard Yi, a fourth-year biomedical engineering major, is starting a similar
club focused on photography.

The club is intended
to ‘promote the art of photography at UCI and raise the level of student
photography through peer collaboration,’ according to Ryon Graf, third-year
biological sciences major and vice president of the club.

The club is not to be
mistaken for an intro-level class and does not require technical knowledge of
photography. It is open to all students who appreciate photography as art,
whether they are taking pictures or just examining them.

Yi anticipates opening
a forum for people to submit their photographs. He will conduct meetings in
which members offer harsh criticism of an anonymous club member’s work.

Yi also intends to
hold open discussions about photography, including topics like the point at
which photography becomes art. He will also invite professors to talk about
photography and plan trips on which members
can practice photography skills.

Yi also wants to focus
on film developing as an art, as well as digital photo manipulation.

At the end of the school
year, Yi plans to arrange an exhibition on campus, which he said will be a ‘classy
event.’

Please contact Richard Yi
at yir@uci.edu or visit the Facebook group, ‘Photography Club at UCI’ for more
information.

To introduce clubs and
organizations, both old and new, to incoming students, UCI is conducting the
Anteater Club Fair and BBQ on Monday, Sept. 18. The fair will feature over 400
clubs at UCI, exciting displays and a barbeque. The free event will be held in
Aldrich Park.

For more information on
the many clubs at UCI, visit the Web site of the dean of students:
www.dos.uci.edu.