iTunes U: The Lectures You Need, a Vendor You know

Technology is rapidly catching up to the frenetic (and often apathetic) student lifestyle. While remote lectures via Internet or Web cam are not unheard of, and rumors of podcast lectures trickle into college culture, there has yet to be the widespread embrace of the Internet that students hope will eliminate the classroom altogether.
Apple brings us one step closer to that wondrous goal. In cooperation with universities across the nation, including Stanford University, Duke University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, iTunes U was launched on May 30, 2007.
The program, available as a channel in the iTunes Store, allows anyone with iTunes and an Internet connection to download lectures, presentations, event podcasts and sports broadcasts from top schools in both video and audio format. Downloadable content ranges from consecutive class audio lectures to special videotaped presentations. Best of all, everything in the iTunes U channel is completely free.
As of April 4, 2008, UC Berkeley is the only school in the UC system hosting content on iTunes U.
Featuring over 4,000 lectures, event reports and featurettes on campus life, Berkeley embraced the possibilities of iTunes U. So why hasn’t UC Irvine jumped on the digital wagon?
“We have the infrastructure and log-ins all ready to go,” said Stephen Franklin, director for Academic Outreach for the Network and Academic Computing Services, and a lecturer for the Bren School of the Information and Computer Sciences.
The only step left is for the faculty to work with NACS to upload content, although Franklin emphasized the ever-increasing workload mounting on the faculty’s shoulders. “Additionally, this is just one of many vehicles for getting material out