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UCI Researchers Receive AAAS Fellowship

Ten University of California, Irvine professors and researchers were formally named American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) fellows in the AAAS News and Notes section of Science last Friday, Nov. 24. They join ranks with 150 past AAAS fellows from UCI.

Founded in 1848, AAAS is a non-profit organization and the world’s largest scientific society. It also publishes “Science,” one of the world’s top academic journals, along with “Science Advances,” “Science Immunology,” “Science Robotics,” “Science Signaling” and “Science Translational Medicine.”

UCI honorees are as follows:

Christopher Barty, professor of physics and astronomy, conducts research in plasma physics and was recognized for his research in the applications of ultrahigh-intensity lasers.

Associate chemistry professor Suzanne Blum was noted for her studies in molecular chemistry and development of microscopy tools.

Adriana Briscoe, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, does research in molecular evolution and looks at the behaviors of light-sensitive pigments in color vision.

Chemistry professor Kieron Burke is acknowledged for developing computational modeling methods to better examine the structure of atoms and molecules.

Chancellor’s professor of computer science David Eppstein was awarded for the design and analysis of algorithms in computational geometry, graph theory and graph drawing.

Efi Foufoula-Georgiou is a distinguished professor of civil and environmental engineering and conducts research in surface hydrology and hydroclimatology.

School of Physical Sciences dean and chemistry professor Kenneth Janda works toward increased understanding of molecular forces.

Craig Stark, professor of neurobiology and behavior, studies how neural systems support long-term memory, with emphasis on the hippocampus. He is also recognized for explaining this work to the general public.

Lizhi Sun, professor of civil and environmental engineering, is noted for his work in studying the behaviors of heterogeneous composite materials.

Kathleen Treseder is the Francisco J. Ayala Chair in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. She researches fungi and examines how they influence ecosystem function to predict how the world will be affected by climate change.

This year’s 396 honorees will each receive a certificate and a blue and gold rosette pin. Fellows will be honored at the organization’s annual meeting in Austin, Texas on Feb. 17, 2018.

 

Chancellor Gillman Joins Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities Board

University of California, Irvine Chancellor Howard Gillman was recently elected to the governing board of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU), making him the first UC chancellor to serve on the board.

HACU was established in 1986 and is the only education organization that represents Hispanic-serving institutions. At these institutions, at least one quarter of the undergraduate population is Latino and at least half of all students receive financial aid. The Department of Education named UCI a Hispanic-serving institution earlier this year. The university is one of two Association of American Universities members to have this distinction.

 

UCI Professor Selected as American Bar Fellow

University of California, Irvine Chancellor’s Professor of Law Carrie Menkel-Meadow will receive the 2018 American Bar Foundation Fellows Outstanding Scholar Award for her work in alternative dispute resolution.

The award has been given annually since 1957 and recognizes outstanding work in law and government.

Menkel-Meadow is noted as a founder of the modern field of alternative dispute resolution, which refers to the settling of disputes outside the courtroom, including negotiation and mediation. A 2007 Fulbright scholar, Menkel-Meadow is also an international expert in legal ethics and feminist legal theory. Among other awards, she is the first-ever recipient of the American Bar Association’s Award for Outstanding Scholarly Work in 2011.

Professor Menkel-Meadow has authored many books on dispute resolution. Before arriving at UCI, she taught at UCLA, the University of Toronto, Harvard Law School, Stanford Law School and the University of Pennsylvania.

The 2018 fellows will be honored at the 62nd Annual Fellows Awards Reception and Banquet in Vancouver, British Columbia on Feb. 3, 2018.

 

Protests Over Net Neutrality Scheduled at Irvine Verizon Locations

Many Internet sites like Reddit, Twitter and Netflix are banding together against cable companies and the Federal Communications Commission in support of net neutrality. The campaign, titled “Battle for the Net” is planning protests nationwide including two at Verizon stores in Irvine.

Net neutrality is a policy by which Internet providers like Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and Time Warner Cable cannot control what users see and do on the Internet. Under the Obama administration, the FCC adopted net neutrality in 2015, but the FCC’s new appointees, made by the Trump administration, are looking to dismantle it.

According to the campaign website, “Cable companies are famous for high prices and poor service. Several rank as the most hated companies in America. Now, they’re lobbying the FCC and Congress to end net neutrality. Why? It’s simple: if they win the power to slow sites down, they can bully any site into paying millions to escape the ‘slow lane.’ This would amount to a tax on every sector of the American economy. Every site would cost more, since they’d all have to pay big cable. Worse, it would extinguish the startups and independent voices who can’t afford to pay. If we lose net neutrality, the Internet will never be the same.”

The campaign is calling on the public to urge their congressional representatives to support net neutrality and stop an FCC vote from killing it.

The Irvine protests will take place on Dec. 2 and Dec. 7 in front of Verizon stores on Michelson Drive, Irvine and Harbor Boulevard, Costa Mesa respectively.

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